PEACE — ITS SPIRITUAL FOUNDATION

Everyone wants to be happy. No bone   wants to suffer. This is so egregious to people, me included, that for a long time I noway questioned it. Now I do. The aged I grow, the further I'm drawn to peace, indeed further than to happiness. When I'm at peace with myself, I see easily what makes me happy and what does n’t — and this teaches me what I should do and what I should n’t do. When I'm at peace with the world around me, I see easily why there's suffering and this teaches me what I can do to minimize the suffering, others ’ as well as my own. Peace is at formerly a schoolteacher and a facilitator.       Peace is also fugitive. We'll see veritably little of it in the world if we depend only on the captions in themedia.However, we will discover peace on the face of a baby sleeping in the cradle, in the movements of a mama as she culinarians for her family, If we look a bit precisely however. multitudinous as similar cases are, similar peaceful hiatuses in life are also generally short- lived and far- between. Peace is noway absent, but its presence is sporadic and changeable, both in our own hearts and in the world that we encounter. The actuality of peace is beyond mistrustfulness, but its fragility causes noway - ending concern. Whenever peace is shattered, it leads to stress, anxiety, mistrustfulness and, in extreme case, may lead to a fight or indeed war.   The primary interference to peace may well be a feeling of emptiness, occasionally total but more frequently partial. Feeling “ incompletely empty ” is the same as feeling ever not complete or whole, or feeling that there's commodity lacking. There can be no peace if I'm deprived of food or sleep, or have no musketeers, recognition, or love — or if I warrant the capability to cover myself, to assert my being, to fulfill my dreams. With similar acute sense of lacking, I can not be at peace. Without peace, how can anyone be happy?( aśāntasya kutaḥ sukham) — this is what the Gita(2.66) asks.       Unfortunately, the world in which we live, move and grow isn't designed to support our deep need for peace. Ambition, rapacity, covetousness, covetousness all of these would n’t live if everyone and everything were at peace. Trade and commerce would n’t flourish if everyone were tone- sufficient or had only minimum requirements. generally those who warrant peace utmost are the bones   that wo n’t allow others to live in peace. The only time utmost people witness peace is in deep sleep, when they aren't indeed featuring. A central specific of deep sleep is the absence of everyone and everything. There's only one being present in sleep — the person who's sleeping and passing peace and bliss.    Sleep is a natural event, taking hardly any trouble on our part. In fact, in order to sleep, we need to abandon all trouble. The stylish we can do is produce an terrain that's generally favorable to sleep — and also just stay patiently. Sleep is commodity that happens, not commodity that can be done. The peace we witness in sleep is restorative but we can not control its duration. Is there a way we canre-create that same kind of peace purposely, freely, with trouble? Since sleep is the absence of all objects, is there a way we can replicate that experience when we're awake and girdled by people and objects?       The answer is yes, an emphatic yes. The experience can be replicated when we're awake, not physically but spiritually. Being awake spiritually means being awake to the spirit. At present we're awake to the material world, not to the spiritual world. This is what the Gita(2.69) alludes to when it says that what's night to others is day to a yogi, and what's night to a yogi is day to others. In other words, what we see outdoors is directly related to what we're outside.   At present we see ourselves as material beings — our body, mind and senses is all that we're apprehensive of. That's why all that we encounter around us is also material and follows the laws of matter. Every object we encounter is composed of patches of matter. These material patches are kept together by some kind of force, giving the object a form. When the force is dissipated, the patches come piecemeal, the form is lost, and the object is said to putrefy. The world we see through our senses of sight, smell, touch, taste and hail has these two interspersing processes, composition and corruption, constantly in action.       But there's another world beyond the senses — call it, if you like, the world of the spirit. Nothing in this other world is composed and hence nothing in it ever decomposes. Because this world is beyond the reach of anything material, it can be reached by neither the body nor the mind nor the senses. But these are the only instruments we have. Luckily for us, what we discover is that these instruments, when meliorated, come more important than they're now and acquire the capability to reveal the spiritual world. Whatever brings about this kind of refinement is called a spiritual practice or yoga.   Swami Vivekananda classified all spiritual practices primarily into four groups. Jnana yoga was the name he gave to those practices which purify and harness the power of reason. Bhakti yoga, according to him, comprises practices that purify and harness the power of feelings. Raja yoga purifies and harnesses the power of the will as it operates within us, and air yoga purifies and harnesses the same power as it manifests through work in the world.       Through one or further of these practices, the spiritual world is reached. It's a kind of trip, but unlike any trip we've known before. It's a trip not from one place to another in the external world, it's a trip in the internal world through layers of personality, a trip to precipitously subtler, lesser and further inward layers.( See Kaṭhopaniṣad,1.3.10- 11 with Śaṅkarācārya’s commentary for farther reading.) When a person reaches the end of this strange trip, he or she not only gests peace but, we can indeed say, becomes peace.   There's no mistrustfulness that peace, both inner and external, can be reached by other means as well. To achieve peace in the external world it's the social and political tools that are generally employed. To achieve inner peace, people occasionally resort to investing time and energy in effects that they're passionate about. Music, recreation, spending time with family and musketeers — these kinds of effects do bring a measure of peace. Peace is also set up by those leading an ethical life, a life seeking to cultivate moral merits, a life guided by principles of dharma.       All of these styles of attaining peace are substantially effective but generally fragile, since the peace that's attained is shattered sooner or latterly. Only the peace that comes through spiritual practice, and especially the peace that's endured when the practice reaches its capstone — called God- consummation or tone- consummation — is stable and embedded in a firm foundation. Not for nothing is it said that it's the “ peace that passeth understanding. ”                                     Source:Vedanta society,Wikipedia

Everyone wants to be happy. No bone

 wants to suffer. This is so egregious to people, me included, that for a long time I noway questioned it. Now I do. The aged I grow, the further I'm drawn to peace, indeed further than to happiness. When I'm at peace with myself, I see easily what makes me happy and what does n’t — and this teaches me what I should do and what I should n’t do. When I'm at peace with the world around me, I see easily why there's suffering and this teaches me what I can do to minimize the suffering, others ’ as well as my own. Peace is at formerly a schoolteacher and a facilitator. 

 

 Peace is also fugitive. We'll see veritably little of it in the world if we depend only on the captions in themedia.However, we will discover peace on the face of a baby sleeping in the cradle, in the movements of a mama as she culinarians for her family, If we look a bit precisely however. multitudinous as similar cases are, similar peaceful hiatuses in life are also generally short- lived and far- between. Peace is noway absent, but its presence is sporadic and changeable, both in our own hearts and in the world that we encounter. The actuality of peace is beyond mistrustfulness, but its fragility causes noway - ending concern. Whenever peace is shattered, it leads to stress, anxiety, mistrustfulness and, in extreme case, may lead to a fight or indeed war. 

The primary interference to peace may well be a feeling of emptiness, occasionally total but more frequently partial. Feeling “ incompletely empty ” is the same as feeling ever not complete or whole, or feeling that there's commodity lacking. There can be no peace if I'm deprived of food or sleep, or have no musketeers, recognition, or love — or if I warrant the capability to cover myself, to assert my being, to fulfill my dreams. With similar acute sense of lacking, I can not be at peace. Without peace, how can anyone be happy?( aśāntasya kutaḥ sukham) — this is what the Gita(2.66) asks. 

 

 Unfortunately, the world in which we live, move and grow isn't designed to support our deep need for peace. Ambition, rapacity, covetousness, covetousness all of these would n’t live if everyone and everything were at peace. Trade and commerce would n’t flourish if everyone were tone- sufficient or had only minimum requirements. generally those who warrant peace utmost are the bones

 that wo n’t allow others to live in peace. The only time utmost people witness peace is in deep sleep, when they aren't indeed featuring. A central specific of deep sleep is the absence of everyone and everything. There's only one being present in sleep — the person who's sleeping and passing peace and bliss. 

 Sleep is a natural event, taking hardly any trouble on our part. In fact, in order to sleep, we need to abandon all trouble. The stylish we can do is produce an terrain that's generally favorable to sleep — and also just stay patiently. Sleep is commodity that happens, not commodity that can be done. The peace we witness in sleep is restorative but we can not control its duration. Is there a way we canre-create that same kind of peace purposely, freely, with trouble? Since sleep is the absence of all objects, is there a way we can replicate that experience when we're awake and girdled by people and objects? 

 

 The answer is yes, an emphatic yes. The experience can be replicated when we're awake, not physically but spiritually. Being awake spiritually means being awake to the spirit. At present we're awake to the material world, not to the spiritual world. This is what the Gita(2.69) alludes to when it says that what's night to others is day to a yogi, and what's night to a yogi is day to others. In other words, what we see outdoors is directly related to what we're outside. 

At present we see ourselves as material beings — our body, mind and senses is all that we're apprehensive of. That's why all that we encounter around us is also material and follows the laws of matter. Every object we encounter is composed of patches of matter. These material patches are kept together by some kind of force, giving the object a form. When the force is dissipated, the patches come piecemeal, the form is lost, and the object is said to putrefy. The world we see through our senses of sight, smell, touch, taste and hail has these two interspersing processes, composition and corruption, constantly in action. 

 

 But there's another world beyond the senses — call it, if you like, the world of the spirit. Nothing in this other world is composed and hence nothing in it ever decomposes. Because this world is beyond the reach of anything material, it can be reached by neither the body nor the mind nor the senses. But these are the only instruments we have. Luckily for us, what we discover is that these instruments, when meliorated, come more important than they're now and acquire the capability to reveal the spiritual world. Whatever brings about this kind of refinement is called a spiritual practice or yoga. 

Swami Vivekananda classified all spiritual practices primarily into four groups. Jnana yoga was the name he gave to those practices which purify and harness the power of reason. Bhakti yoga, according to him, comprises practices that purify and harness the power of feelings. Raja yoga purifies and harnesses the power of the will as it operates within us, and air yoga purifies and harnesses the same power as it manifests through work in the world. 

 

 Through one or further of these practices, the spiritual world is reached. It's a kind of trip, but unlike any trip we've known before. It's a trip not from one place to another in the external world, it's a trip in the internal world through layers of personality, a trip to precipitously subtler, lesser and further inward layers.( See Kaṭhopaniṣad,1.3.10- 11 with Śaṅkarācārya’s commentary for farther reading.) When a person reaches the end of this strange trip, he or she not only gests peace but, we can indeed say, becomes peace. 

There's no mistrustfulness that peace, both inner and external, can be reached by other means as well. To achieve peace in the external world it's the social and political tools that are generally employed. To achieve inner peace, people occasionally resort to investing time and energy in effects that they're passionate about. Music, recreation, spending time with family and musketeers — these kinds of effects do bring a measure of peace. Peace is also set up by those leading an ethical life, a life seeking to cultivate moral merits, a life guided by principles of dharma. 

 

 All of these styles of attaining peace are substantially effective but generally fragile, since the peace that's attained is shattered sooner or latterly. Only the peace that comes through spiritual practice, and especially the peace that's endured when the practice reaches its capstone — called God- consummation or tone- consummation — is stable and embedded in a firm foundation. Not for nothing is it said that it's the “ peace that passeth understanding. ” 

                                  Source:Vedanta society,Wikipedia

 

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